Dublin – September 8th, 2014

After a night of rest, our first stop: Guinness Storehouse! We embarked on our journey to the storehouse first thing on Monday morning. We decided to walk alongside the River Liffey to get a bit more familiar with the city. The highlight of the walk was the Four Courts, Ireland’s main court building which included the Supreme Court, High Court, and Circuit Court. After a thirty minute walk, we finally made it to the Guinness Storehouse! The building is surrounded by a glass atrium that is shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The self-guided tour was rich with history, effectively introducing us to Sir Arthur Guinness and the process for crafting Guinness. It is evident that Guinness was ahead of its in time in terms of its marketing, production, and distribution. After making our way through a variety of self-guided exhibits, I was incredibly thirsty for a pint! Luckily for me, Kelsey purchased tickets to the exclusive Connoisseur Experience! I highly recommend this to anyone visiting the Storehouse! We were escorted to a hidden exclusive bar with another couple for our exclusive Guinness tasting! It was truly amazing – the decor, the lighting, and all of the Guinness! We tried four different kinds of Guinness and even got to pour our first pints ever, for which we received special certificates! After the exclusive bar, we then went up to the Gravity Bar which offered us with a full view of the Dublin skyline. The visuals were breathtaking.

After the Storehouse, we walked back to the center of the city, passing by a few churches (Christchurch, Dublinia) on our way to Grafton Street. Grafton is Dublin’s premiere shopping street filled with luxury shops, street performers, and tourists. We walked through a few of the stores before making it to St. Stephens Green at the end of the street. The Green is a public park in Dublin, where we relaxed for a little bit and engaged in people watching.

In the evening, we walked down O’Connell Street on the North Side, taking inventory of all of the shops and all of monuments on the Island in the middle of the street. The most awe-inspiring was the Spire. It is a needle-shaped stainless steel metal “statue” that extends 394 feet in the air, commonly known to locals as “the erection at the intersection” and “stiffy at the Liffey.” The General Post Office was right alongside the Spire and was similarly magnificent in its Georgian architecture with its majestic columns and portico. We spent the rest of Monday evening walking throughout Dublin, briefly entering Trinity College to take in its grounds. We walked throughout Dame Street, and eventually had dinner at a wonderful tapa’s place called Salamanca. After dinner, we headed over to the Palace Bar, one of Ireland’s premier literary pubs! This was a traditional bar with an authentic Irish feel. The walls were adorned with photographs of famous Irish authors, and it was a cozy pub to sit, relax, and enjoy a pint of Guinness to close out our Monday evening!

The Four Courts

The Four Courts

Guinness Brewery at St. James Gate

Guinness Brewery at St. James Gate

Guinness: more than your typical beer

Guinness: more than your typical beer

There's poetry in a pint of Guinness

There’s poetry in a pint of Guinness

The exclusive Connoisseur Experience Bar!

The exclusive Connoisseur Experience Bar!

A perfect pour!

A perfect pour!

The Spire

The Spire

The famous Molly Malone - affectionately known as "tart with the cart."

The famous Molly Malone – affectionately known as “tart with the cart.”

A Dublin tradition: a nightcap of Guinness

A Dublin tradition: a nightcap of Guinness

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